Eagle Scout Advancement

 


The Hornets Nest District has moved to a form request rather than an email request to request an Eagle Project Review.

 

 

 

This form is to be used by Life Scouts of the Hornets Nest District to request a review of their Eagle project proposal.  Once the request is received, a reviewer will be assigned and the Scout will receive an email confirmation.  The reviewer will contact the Life Scout directly using the email provided in the form. The Parent email and Unit Leader email will be cc'ed on the email from the reviewer back to the Scout.

 

Hornets Nest Eagle Project Review Request Form


Items to double check ...

1.  Ensure you have ALL your signatures for your proposal.  The signatures required prior to a District review are the Scout, Unit Leader, Unit Committee and Beneficiary. All of these signatures should be on the same page. Email approvals are acceptable if a written signature is not attainable, but must be on the same signature page from the Eagle Scout workbook proposal section. You can email a scanned copy of the signature page to each approver one at a time to get approvals if necessary. Don't forget to sign the signature page yourself.

2.  Make sure you are using the latest Eagle Project workbook PDF. The Eagle Scout workbook is a fillable PDF so the easiest way to fill it out is on a computer. If filled out manually, the Scout will still need to get it back to a PDF format so it can be sent electronically to the reviewer. The reviewer will ask you to email the PDF to him/her.  Be Prepared!

 

3. Make sure all sections of the Eagle Scout workbook proposal section are filled out prior to asking for District review.


ANY REQUESTS THAT ARE EMAILED DIRECTLY TO hornetsnest.advancement@gmail.com WILL STILL MONITORED AND ACCEPTED.  HOWEVER,  THE LIFE SCOUT WILL ALSO BE ASKED TO COMPLETE REQUEST FORM IN A FOLLOW-UP EMAIL.  

For general questions about the form or the Hornets Nest Eagle project review process, please send your email question(s) to hornetsnest.advancement@gmail.com.

 

As a reminder, please continue to follow recommended YPT policies with electronic communications.


 

Before You Begin...

Permits, Permissions, and Authorizations for Eagle Scout Service Projects Updated – May 13, 2022

 

 

If the project requires building permits, etc. the Scout needs to know about them for his planning. However, the Beneficiary is responsible for all permitting. This is not a duty for the Scout.

 

Permit Discrepancies

At times the Scout can be in the middle of two organizations, one saying a permit is required and another saying it is not. In these situations, a Scout should include a summary of the discussion in the “Permits and Permission” section of the Eagle Project Service Workbook with details as when the discussion occurred, with who and the end result.

For example: “On mm/dd/yyyy, Mr. “John Doe” of the Mecklenburg County Permit Office reviewed my project proposal by phone. He told me that a Building Permit was not needed.”
 “On mm/dd/yyyy, Mr. “Jim Smith” representing the project beneficiary indicated that he will be contacting the Mecklenburg County Permit Office and securing any building permits before works begins on the project.”
“On mm/dd/yyyy, Mr. “Jim Smith” as the project’s beneficiary indicated that a building permit is not required and has granted his authority to proceed without one."
 

Mecklenburg County Permit Contact

The project beneficiary (or the Scout) seeking permitting information/authorization should contact Scott Westbrook at the Mecklenburg County Permit Office at the below email address or telephone number:

 

Scott.westbrook@mecklenburgcountync.gov
Telephone: (980) 314-3114

For the email contact, be sure to indicate in the subject line that this is related to an Eagle Scout project proposal.

 

Digging

For projects that involve digging, please consider potential damage to buried telephone lines, cable wires, fiberoptic data lines, Invisible Fence wires, electricity wires, water pipes, irrigation pipes, gas lines, rain run-off drain pipes. More information is available at – http://www.nc811.org/ For projects involving cutting trees, please consider BSA safety guidelines for Scout Camp Rangers dealing with tree cutting at camps and the height of tree stumps. Waisthigh stumps are visible in tall grass and can be seen by walkers as well as mower operators. If stumps are lower, the stumps can cause trips and falls and can be struck by a mower. Another option would be to grind the stumps, but grinding equipment and qualified, experienced operators may not be readily available.

 

For projects that involve digging, please consider potential damage to buried telephone lines, cable wires, fiberoptic data lines, Invisible Fence wires, electricity wires, water pipes, irrigation pipes, gas lines, rain run-off drain pipes. More information
For projects involving cutting trees, please consider BSA safety guidelines for Scout Camp Rangers dealing with tree cutting at camps and the height of tree stumps. Waisthigh stumps are visible in tall grass and can be seen by walkers as well as mower operators. If stumps are lower, the stumps can cause trips and falls and can be struck by a mower. Another option would be to grind the stumps, but grinding equipment and qualified, experienced operators may not be readily available.

Charlotte ToolBank provides inexpensive access to tools for group projects. Get a glimpse of what they offer by watching this video

Scouts and units may also borrow tools from Belk Scout Camp for service and conservation projects.

 

For completion of the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 512-927 section on Preliminary Cost Estimate, then Fundraising, on Project Page D, please consider Scout law # 9: A Scout is thrifty.

This description was recorded in the First Edition of the Boy Scout Handbook in 1911:

"He does not wantonly destroy property. He works faithfully, wastes nothing, and makes the best use of his opportunities. He saves his money so that he may pay his own way, be generous to those in need, and helpful to worthy objects. He may work for pay but must not receive tips for courtesies or good turns."

If a Scout indicates that he will contribute to the funding of the project from money he has saved from part-time or summer work or from allowance or from gifts, the Scout is indicating his commitment to Scouting values. This kind of statement is not required.

For completion of the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 512-927 section on Preliminary Cost Estimate, then Fundraising, on Project Page D, please consult the troop treasurer on how to manage funds collected from donors before asking for donations.

A Scout must not receive cash or personal checks made out to the Scout.

Donations and Taxes

Donations by check should be directed to a troop account or to a beneficiary account. If project funds are managed through a troop account, an adult leader serving as troop treasurer must manage all deposits and all withdrawals for reimbursements of expenses supported by receipts. If project funds are managed through a beneficiary account, an adult designated by the beneficiary must manage all deposits and all withdrawals for reimbursements of expenses.

Scouts should make photocopies of all checks and of all receipts and of all reimbursements and should track all income and all expenses for the project.

Each project must be self-funded, not relying on any troop funding for completion. Although troops may receive checks made out to “BSA Troop 123” for “John Doe’s Eagle Project”, Scouts should not imply or indicate in any way that a donation is “tax deductible.” Chartered organizations, like churches, are often charitable organizations with Nonprofit Tax Code Designation of 501(c)(3) to whom contributions may be tax deductible, but Scout troops usually are not.
Donors, working with their own tax accountants, should determine the tax treatment of their donations.

Crowdfunding for Eagle Scout projects

BSA does allow crowdfunding for Eagle Scout projects but the issue and process can be complicated to remain in full compliance with both BSA and the crowdfunding site rules. Here is a link to a full discussion
 

For completion of the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 512-927 section on Safety Issues, on Project Page E, please consider the requirement for no less than 2- deep adult leadership, with 2 BSA-registered adults at least 21 years of age current on BSA Youth Protection Training, on “all Scouting activities”, including Eagle Scout projects.

Scouts should address potential safety concerns, including where applicable but not limited to:

  • Driving
  • Seat belts
  • Cell phone use while driving
  • Work gloves for hand protection from wood splinters, blisters, metal cuts
  • Non-latex gloves for chemical, solvent, concrete, or paint exposure
  • Safety glasses or goggles
  • Hearing protection
  • Hard hats
  • Closed toe shoes
  • Work boots
  • Long pants
  • Long-sleeve shirts
  • Knee pads
  • Sun block
  • Mosquito and tick repellent
  • Hats
  • Water
  • Food
  • Restroom access
  • Exposure to venomous snakes (Please consider Tenderfoot requirement 4 a.)
  • Exposure to poisonous plants (Please consider Tenderfoot requirement 4 b.)
  • Exposure to bees, fire ants, ticks, mosquitoes, and/or other stinging or biting insects
  • Exposure to lead paint, asbestos
  • Safety with pressure-treated wood
  • Participants with medications (EpiPen, asthma inhalers)
  • First aid kit on site
  • Land-line or cell phone access for emergencies
  • Ventilated work spaces
  • Buried utility cables (electricity, telephone, cable, fiberoptic)
  • Water pipes, irrigation pipes, gas pipes. Before You Dig
  • Use of power tools
  • Use of hand tools
  • Work at heights

 

For information on BSA "Age Guidelines for Tool Use and Work at Elevations or Excavations", please review the BSA's SAFE Project Tool Use

Printing this document and including it in the Eagle Project Proposal that a Scout presents for approval reinforces these guidelines.

Public Health Guidelines

For work teams to reduce risk of COVID-19 virus transmission: Work teams should follow public health directives related to social distancing and hygiene. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Wearing face coverings to and from work sites and during work
  • Wearing gloves Practicing good hygiene with frequent hand washing
  • Using hand sanitizer
  • Avoiding handshakes and high fives
  • Wiping tools and surfaces with sanitizer before and after use
  • Practicing spacing of at least 6 feet during work
  • Avoiding traveling in multi-passenger vehicles when possible and wearing masks during travel and traveling with vehicle windows down to maximize ventilation
  • Maintaining group sizes of less than 10, including supervising adults
  • Fixed cohorts (work crews with no intermingling)
  • Check-in health checks and waiver forms (retained for possible contact tracing)

Driving Safety

Information on BSA policies related to driving by youth under age 18.  BSA policies prohibit any youth under age 18 from driving himself or herself or other Scouts or gear to or from troop or crew meetings, camping trips, area, regional, or national events. Please note: Seat belts are required for all occupants.
Drivers must not use hand-held cell phones while driving.

 

Tree Safety

For projects involving cutting trees, please consider BSA safety guidelines for Scout Camp Rangers dealing with tree cutting at camps and the height of tree stumps. Waisthigh stumps are visible in tall grass and can be seen by walkers as well as mower operators. If stumps are lower, the stumps can cause trips and falls and can be struck by a mower. Another option would be to grind the stumps, but grinding equipment and qualified, experienced operators may not be readily available.

Conservation projects can be important Eagle Projects that can also be “counted” as applicable for a BSA Distinguished Conservation Service Award.
If a Scout wishes to pursue a Conservation Service Award, the Scout should consult a Conservation Service Award Advisor from the Council Conservation Committee from the very beginning of planning and discussions about a project. A Scouts who completes a conservation-related Eagle Project and then seeks to use the project for a Conservation Award is unlikely to meet requirements for: 1. Identification of an environmental issue 2. Research into the issue 3. Defining how the project addresses the issue 4. Planning which of the 9 Environment Categories for a Conservation Award that the project applies to 5. Involvement of and education of the public about the environmental issue and the project.

Trail building and maintenance can be meaningful Eagle Projects to improve access for the public to “natural” experiences. Scouts should learn trail design and building techniques with supervision by qualified, experienced adults before undertaking a trail project. From a conservation perspective, Scouts should not rake or clear trails to bare soil.
Keeping organic matter as soil cover dissipates the energy of falling water. Maintaining a mulch-like cover on trails, especially on downhill slopes, can prevent washes and gullies. Pages 12 and 13 of this publication give information on berms and water bars to divert water flow on trails with slopes.

Please remember that an Eagle Project is more about leadership than about the completion of a design or of a constructed structure.

Keys to success are communicating, planning, organizing, inspiring, and managing a team to perform this work.

While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project must benefit an organization other than the Boy Scouts of America.) A project proposal must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your unit leader and unit committee, and the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, BSA publication No. 512-927, in meeting this requirement.

Eagle Scout requirement 5 BSA Guide to Advancement 2021, page 64 : 9.0.2.4 “Give Leadership to Others …”

“Others” means at least two people besides the Scout. Helpers may be involved in Scouting or not, and of any age appropriate for the work. In cases where just three people are not able to conduct a project to the satisfaction of a beneficiary, then more would be advisable. It may be, however, that a well-chosen project conducted by only three provides an impact not achievable with those involving more.

BSA Guide to Advancement 2021, page 65 : BSA does not provide guidelines on the degree of family and/or non-family involvement. However, Scouts are strongly encouraged to recruit workers from among their friends and contacts at school, on sports teams, at church, and among neighbors. Scouts from any troop are especially encouraged to participate in Eagle projects, because they may be able to complete rank advancement requirements for service hours with permission from their Scoutmaster(s) and because they develop knowledge and experience that will help them with planning and execution of their future Eagle projects.

 

The District Eagle Project Review Committees have been receiving an abundance of Eagle Scout projects to review just prior to the Eagle candidate’s 18th birthday. This situation is causing a significant difficulty for both the candidate and the volunteer committee in reviewing and approving the project to accommodate the 18th birthday deadline.

The Council Advancement Committee strongly recommends any projects to be reviewed should be submitted at least six months prior to the candidate’s 18th birthday.

 

The Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No.2021c, is required to be used to develop and complete the service project for Requirement #5 for the Eagle Scout Award. Before beginning the “Project Proposal” section, it is highly recommended that the Scout read and understand the entire workbook.


Preparing the Project Proposal

Your proposal must be completed first.  It is an overview, but also the beginnings of planning.  Be sure to read "Instructions for preparing your proposal" in the Eagle Scout project Workbook.

Meet the Five Tests of an Acceptable Eagle Scout Service Project
 

Complete the Proposal Portion of the Eagle Scout Project Workbook

Contact Information

Your Council Service Center:

Laura Bachelder
(704) 333-5471
1410 East 7th Street
Charlotte NC 28204
mcc.eagle@scouting.org

Your Council or District Project Approval Representative:

This information should be provided to you during your Project Proposal Review

Approval Signatures

Once you have completed your proposal, Sign the Candidates Promise and then present your project you your Unit Leader, Unit Commitee, and Project Beneficiary for their review, approval, and signatures.


Project Proposal Review and Approval

Once you have completed your proposal, Sign the Candidates Promise and then present your project you your Unit Leader, Unit Commitee, and Project Beneficiary for their review, approval, and signatures.

Be sure to include any supporting documentation of approval.  If your project beneficiary is a CMS school, please follow the CMS Project Beneficiary Guidelines.

Schedule your District Review following the guidlines provided below.

You must have all 5 signatures before beginning your project.

Check your Districts' information by selecting the tab above, or visit their home page, for information on how, when, and where they are conducting Eagle Project Reviews, to verify if their Eagle Project Reviews are being done in person or virtually, and how to schedule a review.

Once you have all five signatures on your approval page, you are ready to complete your project plan and begin your project!

The Hornets Nest District has moved to a form request rather than an email request to request an Eagle Project Review.

 

This form is to be used by Life Scouts of the Hornets Nest District to request a review of their Eagle project proposal.  Once the request is received, a reviewer will be assigned and the Scout will receive an email confirmation.  The reviewer will contact the Life Scout directly using the email provided in the form. The Parent email and Unit Leader email will be cc'ed on the email from the reviewer back to the Scout.

 

Hornets Nest Eagle Project Review Request Form


Items to double check ...

1.  Ensure you have ALL your signatures for your proposal.  The signatures required prior to a District review are the Scout, Unit Leader, Unit Committee and Beneficiary. All of these signatures should be on the same page. Email approvals are acceptable if a written signature is not attainable, but must be on the same signature page from the Eagle Scout workbook proposal section. You can email a scanned copy of the signature page to each approver one at a time to get approvals if necessary. Don't forget to sign the signature page yourself.

2.  Make sure you are using the latest Eagle Project workbook PDF. The Eagle Scout workbook is a fillable PDF so the easiest way to fill it out is on a computer. If filled out manually, the Scout will still need to get it back to a PDF format so it can be sent electronically to the reviewer. The reviewer will ask you to email the PDF to him/her.  Be Prepared!

 

3. Make sure all sections of the Eagle Scout workbook proposal section are filled out prior to asking for District review.


ANY REQUESTS THAT ARE EMAILED DIRECTLY TO hornetsnest.advancement@gmail.com WILL STILL MONITORED AND ACCEPTED.  HOWEVER,  THE LIFE SCOUT WILL ALSO BE ASKED TO COMPLETE REQUEST FORM IN A FOLLOW-UP EMAIL.  

For general questions about the form or the Hornets Nest Eagle project review process, please send your email question(s) to hornetsnest.advancement@gmail.com.

 

As a reminder, please continue to follow recommended YPT policies with electronic communications.

 


After you have completed your project...

Make sure you have the Scout, Beneficiary, and Unit Leader signatures of approval at the end of the Eagle Scout Project Workbook.

The Eagle Scout Application

All requirements for the Eagle Scout Rank, including the Scoutmaster's Conference, must be completed by the 18th birthday.

Eagle Scout Reference Letters

The Eagle Scout application includes six references (five if not employed.)  A SEALED "Letter of Reference" from each of those references must be included with the Eagle Application.

The “Guide to Advancement” includes the following statements in regards to obtaining statements from these references.

“Council advancement committee members—or others designated—contact the references appearing on the Eagle Scout application. This may be done by letter, form, or phone call. For reasons of privacy and confidentiality, electronic submissions are discouraged. It is acceptable to send or deliver to the references an addressed envelope with instructions, and perhaps a form to complete. The council determines methods of contact.”

Completed reference responses of any kind are the property of the council and are confidential, and only review-board members and those officials with a specific need may see them. The responses are not to be viewed by, or returned to, the Scout. Doing so could discourage the submission of negative information. For the same reason, those providing references shall not be given the option of waiving confidentiality. Once a review has been held, or an appeal process conducted, responses shall be returned to the council, where they will be destroyed after the Eagle Scout credentials are released or the appeal is concluded.”

Mecklenburg County Council has determined that the method of contact will be in the form of a “Letter of Reference” and has designated this responsibility to the Unit. A suggested sample form can be found on the Council’s Website under the Resources Tab, then Eagle Forms. The Unit, with help from the Scout, should request a “Letter of Reference” from the same individuals listed on the Eagle Application and ask that the letter be returned to a member of the Unit in a sealed envelope.

Under extenuating circumstances, if a physical sealed letter of reference is unable to be delivered by the author, they must email their reference letter to mcc.eagle@scouting.org only and to no other recipient as electronic submissions are discouraged by the Guide to Advancement.

These envelopes should remain sealed and submitted with the Scout’s Eagle Application. Any unsealed “Letters of Reference” will be disregarded by the Scout Office as unacceptable and the Unit advised of the proper procedure. The District Advancement Coordinator or District Representative participating in the Eagle Board of Review will reinforce the need to follow proper procedures and will attempt to verbally contact references whose sealed letters were not received.

Join Date, Board of Review Dates, and Merit Badge Dates

Use ScoutBook or my.scouting records to find your person profile.  All dates needed for the application should be listed on your person profile.

Blue cards are not required to be submitted with your Eagle Scout Project Application Package, but are helpful in the verification process.

Position Requirements

Ensure position/s are included on the Leadership Position list under Requirement 4 of the Eagle Scout Application.
Dates listed begin on or after the date of the Life Scout Board of Review.
Dates listed must equal 6 months (to the date) or more.

 

Unit Leader Conference

Note that the unit leader (Scoutmaster) conference need not be the last item accomplished, but must occur while a Life Scout.

Eagle Scout Statement of Ambition and Life Purpose

Eagle Scout Application Requirement 6.

In preparation for your board of review, prepare and attache to your Eagle Scout application a statement of your ambitions and life purpose and a listing of positions held in your religious institution, school, camp, community, or other organizations during which you demonstrated leadership skills.  Include honors and awards received during this service.

Signatures

Complete the certification by applicant and obtain signatures of the Unit Leader and Unit Committee Chair

The BSA Local Council Verification and Requirement 7 will be completed after submitting your project to the Council Service Center.

 


Submit your project to the Council Service Center

Mecklenburg County Council - Service Center
1410 East 7th Street
Charlotte NC 28204
704/333/5471

Submit your completed Eagle Scout Project Workbook, sealed reference letters, statement of ambition and life purpose, and Eagle Scout application along with a copy of your person profile to the Council Service Center.

The Scout Shop staff will review your project for the following items:

Application:    3 signatures
                       Life Scout Position start and end date
                       Scoutmaster Conference date
                       References with Contact Information

Project:           Contact Sheet - listing the current Unit Leader at the time of submitting your application packet
                       Project proposal signatures (5)
                       Project report signatures (3)
                       Pictures of Project 

Other:             Ambition Statement
                       Letters (Sealed by references)
                       Person Profile

Please note: If the troop or Scout requests acknowledgement that the Scout Service Center has received the Eagle Application Package, the troop must provide a receipt form. The recipient at the Scout Service Center will sign and date it.

Processing may take up to four to six weeks.  If any additional information is required the Scout and Unit Leader will be emailed to provide the appropriate documentation or information.  The timeliness of response may expedite or delay the review process.

 


Eagle Scout Board of Review

1.  Using the checklist provided by the National Office, the Scout Service Center coordinator verifies the Eagle application package for completeness and accuracy. This verification includes relevant dates and approval signatures.

2.  The Scout Service Center coordinator contacts the District Advancement Chairman to inform that the package is ready to be picked up for the EBOR.

3.  The District Advancement Chairman either picks up the package from the Scout Service Center or coordinates with a District Representative to pick up the package. To maintain confidentiality of the letters of reference, no other individual is permitted to pick up the package from the Scout Service Center.

4.  The District Advancement or District Representative reviews the Eagle application package to ensure all paperwork, dates, etc. are proper. He/she then phones the Unit contact at the phone number provided with the package to schedule the EBOR meeting. Please note: The Unit Leader and District Representative shall not pre-arrange an EBOR without it first being coordinated by the District Advancement Chairman. This is to avoid confusion of scheduling the EBOR at the district level. Also, neither the unit leader, parents, nor Scout shall request a specific District Representative to attend the EBOR. For scheduling purposes, only the District Advancement Chairman, or their designee, can make this assignment.

5.  The District Representative takes the Eagle application package to the EBOR meeting.

6.  During the 30-minute period preceding the candidate’s interview, the EBOR members review the package for familiarity, completeness, and accuracy. The EBOR then commences.

7.  If the Eagle candidate passes by unanimous decision at the end of the review period, all signatures of the EBOR members are obtained on the appropriate form. The EBOR members determine who will return the completed Eagle application package to the Scout Service Center. This designated individual may be any registered member of the EBOR. The Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook and the statement of ambition and life purpose are returned to the Scout. The Eagle Scout Application, letters of reference and other paperwork in the folder are returned to the Scout Service Center.

8.  If the Scout fails to pass the EBOR by unanimous decision, the reasons why are explained to him/her along with the appeal process that is available. No further EBOR is scheduled at the troop level. The Scout is explained his/her options for an appeal as stated in Section 8.0.4.0 in the Guide to Advancement.  The entire Eagle Application Package is returned to the Scout Service Center. This includes all paperwork that was initially in the package.

General Information Regarding the Eagle Board of Review and the Eagle Application Package

1.  When the final Eagle Scout package is ready to be picked up at the Scout Service Center after it is received from National, the listed Scoutmaster is notified and only a registered Scouter in the respective unit is authorized to pick it up.

2.  Confusion exists among troops as to when a Life Scout actually becomes an Eagle Scout.  Some say immediately after the Scout successfully passes his EBOR.  Others say when National notifies the local council of its approval.  Actually, the latter is correct.  The National Advancement Team states that according to The Guide to Advancement, Section 8.0.3.0, “The Eagle Scout medal or patch must not be sold or otherwise provided to any unit or to the Scout, nor should the court of honor be scheduled until after the certificate is received at the council service center from the National Advancement Program Team. Alternatively, a council-generated report from the Internet Advancement 2.0 System may be used to purchase Eagle Scout items in lieu of the official certificate.”

3.  Per Section 8.0.3.0 in the Guide to Advancement, 2021, at least one district or council representative, who is not affiliated with the unit, must serve as a member of the Eagle Board of Review.  This means that a relative of the Scout, unit leaders and troop committee members and Commissioner to the unit cannot serve as a district or council representative in the unit’s Eagle Board of Review.

4.  Per Section 8.0.0.3 in the Guide to Advancement, 2021, unit leaders and assistants shall not serve on a Board of Review for a Scout in their own unit. Parents, guardians, or relatives shall not serve on a board for their child. The candidate or the candidate’s parent(s) or guardian(s), or relative(s) shall have no part in selecting any board of review members.


Eagle Scout Credentials

After the Board of Review, the Eagle Scout application, reference letters, and any immediate palm forms are returned to the Council Service Center.  The Eagle Scout rank advancement is then reported to the National Advancement Program Team who then returns the Eagle Scout certificate to the local council.  This process may take several weeks.

The Guide to Advancement states:

"The Eagle Scout medal or patch must not be sold or otherwise provided to any unit or to the Scout, nor should the court of honor be scheduled until after the certificate is received at the council service center from the National Advancement Program Team."

 


Eagle Scout Recognition

It is customary for Eagle Scouts to receive congratulatory letters from civic, community, military and other leaders who appreciate and recognize the importance of their accomplishments and wish to support them by providing encouragement.  If you would like to request a letter of congratulations, please visit the links below.

 

The NESA Outstanding Eagle Scout Award

 

The NESA Outstanding Eagle Scout Award (NOESA) is a prestigious recognition granted by the local council's NESA committee to Eagle Scouts who have demonstrated outstanding achievement at the local, state, or regional level. The NOESA recognizes Eagle Scouts whose efforts have made a positive impact in the community. Nominations are due by noon on December 15th, 2022. Send completed forms to Jordan Hitchens.

 

File Name Description
Apache Eagle project Proposal Review Download
CMS Eagle Project Info Download
Eagle Project Five Tests Download
Eagle Scout Letter of Reference Download
Etowah District Eagle Project Proposal Download
Hornets Nest Eagle Project Proposal Download
Immediate Eagle Palm Recognition Download
Project Proposal Signature Page Download